Trustees

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    Trustees

      

    David Hewitt , a founder Trustee, was born and brought up in Blakeney.  He and brother George (see below) were both interested in boats and boatbuilding from an early age, in particular wooden working boats and lifeboats. They built their first pleasure boats in 1976, and their first commercial crab boat Good Courage in 1978.  Since then they have built, restored and maintained a great many craft.  They are both passionate and skillful craftsmen, and their knowledge of the histories, construction and crafts involved in wooden working boats and lifeboats is second to none.

     

    Wendy Pritchard has loved and sought out wooden boats and boatyards since her childhood. She sails Welcome Messenger, a crab boat built by Billy May in 1963 for Bennett Middleton, Sheringham fisherman, and since her early teens has also sailed Honey, a 15 ft clinker Firecrest class built in 1953.  Both of these boats were restored by David Hewitt. She cares greatly about conserving the stories, skills and boats which make up our local and national maritime heritage, and has charity and business management experience. 

     

      

    Simon Garnier spent much of his working life with the National Trust and for 25 years worked in the East of England, with responsibilities across the region including the North Norfolk Coast properties.  He was involved in some of the Trust's larger acquisitions of Orford Ness and Sutton Hoo, as well as helping to consolidate the Trust's holdings at Blakeney and Brancaster.  Having also sailed from Morston for the last thirty years, he has a good understanding of the importance of this coastline, the traditional activities that it continues to support, and the delicate balance that is required to maintain the special quality of the place.  The role of traditional wooden fishing boats is an essential factor in helping to preserve the uniqueness of this coast.

     

     

     

    Henry Faire has been messing around in boats since childhood, initially in the West Country in a Salcombe Yawl and various dinghies, moving on to ocean racing, yacht delivery crewing, and cruising in Brittany and Southern Ireland, to owning and restoring a very rotten 1934 Tumlare on the south coast.  Then, having met a Norfolk girl, he moved his boating activities to Morston, ending up owning the Whelker Knot which was originally built for his father-in-law, and crab boat Auk, built in 2013/14 by David Hewitt and Tom Gathercole.  Boating - when not in Norfolk - is racing on the 60 foot 1904 Bristol Channel Pilot Cutter Mascotte. Working life was 30 years spent in various financial jobs in the City of London.  Wooden boats and their preservation have been a constant obsession throughout.

     

     Tim Lidstone Scott

    Tim Lidstone-Scott started sailing and canoeing during his early teens when he built his first canoe, in his parents dinning room. He joined the Merchant Navy in his late teens, sailing to both exotic and decidedly mundane places. He left the sea to marry, followed by a short spell as a coastguard and a skipper of Norfolk Scout’s MTB102. Moving to North Norfolk in the mid 1980’s with a growing family, all eager to get on the water, the family began to amass powerboats, sailing dinghies, canoes and windsurf boards. For most of his working life he managed Norfolk’s National Trail, the Peddars Way and Norfolk Coast Path, leading a small multi-discipline team working across physical management, survey techniques and data manipulation, tourism, social media. It was a dream job!

     

     

    Liz Hankin O.B.E.  Liz's career was in human resource management, consultancy and campaigning. In 2000 she was appointed O.B.E. for services to women’s employment.

    Liz grew up by the sea in Essex.  Messing about in boats started young and has carried on ever since.  She moved to Norfolk in the 1980s and over the years has spent many happy hours sailing and crewing in various dinghies.  The cruising bug bit in the late 1990s, and in 2000 Liz and her husband Mark sailed across the Atlantic with the ARC. 

    Liz’s involvement with Rescue Wooden Boats began as a volunteer at the Maritime Heritage Centre, and a ‘leg manager’ for Lucy Lavers’s epic journey to Dunkirk.  She was privileged to crew on Lucy Lavers’s return from Dunkirk to Ramsgate, a truly memorable voyage.  She is delighted to be a trustee for Rescue Wooden Boats and looks forward to continuing to work to preserve the skills and knowledge of our maritime heritage.

     

    Alan Bushell

    Awaiting detail

     


     

    Founder Trustees

    George Hewitt was born and brought up in Blakeney.  He and brother David (see above) were both interested in boats and boatbuilding from an early age, in particular wooden working boats and lifeboats. They built their first pleasure boats in 1976, and their first commercial crab boat Good Courage in 1978.  Since then they have built, restored and maintained a great many craft.  They are both passionate and skillful craftsmen, and their knowledge of the histories, construction and crafts involved in wooden working boats and lifeboats is second to none. Now Lucy Lavers is complete, George has stood down as an active Trustee but remains a Founder Trustee and Adviser.

     

    Graeme Peart

    Graeme Peart is the fourth founder Trustee who helped to get the charity started. He spent a lot of time and the Boatyard in Stiffkey and otgether with David Hewitt, tracked down Lucy Lavers. His job then took him to London and he generously donated his whelker Harvester to Rescue Wooden Boats. He continues to sail his wooden crab boat and take an interest in Rescue Wooden Boats.

     


     

    Patron 

  •  Robin - Patron 

    Robin Combe's "...long association with things "watery" began with entry into the Royal Navy aged 13.  An undistinguished naval career, albeit a very enjoyable one, was followed by 10 years in Watney's Brewery - at least we lived in a house directly opposite the boat race finish -, then a 10 year stint breeding trout with varying degrees of success.

    "A passion for fly-fishing and several sea expeditions followed; the most memorable voyage being a 68 year old deckhand on a trans-Atlantic crossing, on the HM Barque Endeavour, a replica of Captain Cook's vessel.

    "Over the last few years my association with the Hewitt brothers, through my purchase of a cockle dinghy (the perfect answer for a geriatric sailor), has led to my enthusiastic support of Rescue Wooden Boats...  It is a wonderful fusion of the display of traditional boatbuilding skills  with its equally important end-use, the long-term fishing tradition of Norfolk.

    "I am very confident that the hard work already displayed by all those involved is going to reach its fruition as one of the jewels in Norfolk's tourist crown, and I am anxious to do what I can to promote their sterling efforts."


  • Education Adviser 

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  • Tim Fisher moved to Norfolk at the grand old age of two back in 1976 and since then has loved being on and around boats.  Originally an R.Y.A. Senior Sailing instructor, he has since swapped the tiller for a whiteboard and teaches at a nearby primary school.  He learnt on a 9 foot lugger and spent nearly nine years restoring a 45 year old Wayfarer - which still needs a new deck.  He and his family go dinghy cruising, and have explored the Cornish and Suffolk coasts as well as the lovely harbours of Norfolk.